Blog

When You Take a Job at a Dive Shop...

Posted: Apr 8, 2013

...always double check your job description!

Two months ago, I took what I thought was a job as a SCUBA technician. It was something I'd been doing for 3 years and was thinking I'd be doing annual services, quick repairs, and rental equipment upkeep. An accurate assumption, but not a compete one! In addition to finding sand in places I never thought possible, as a technician I have:

Repair Tech1. Become a professional mask fitter.

You can make any mask fit with enough determination, but it takes talent and finesse to find the mask that is yours. I thought I knew everything about getting the right person to the right mask, but, man, was I wrong. It's an art form. Luckily, everyone here has set me straight and I'm on my way to obtaining my Mask Fitting Certification card.

2. Mastered multi-tasking (kind of...)

There is something of a herd instinct that makes people want to come to the same place at the same time. The dive shop is no different. So while you may want to focus on writing that blog you've been meaning to get to, the phone's ringing, someone is wanting to buy a mask, a group of 3 wants to book a dive, the sink's overflowing, the sonicator is done, and there's a suspicious hissing sound coming from that tank in the front. Lots of sticky notes and prioritization have been helpful!

3. Written blog(s)

Generally spTech and modeleaking, as someone in SCUBA, I don't do a whole lot of writing. Outside of bookings, those previously mentioned sticky notes, and service details, writing is not on my normal to do list. As such, it has taken an inordinately long period of time to get these few paragraphs typed out! So, not only is Maui Dreams giving me more experience on the bench, but I'm also getting to derustify my ability to put a coherent sentence together. Such job diversity!

4. Acted as a wetsuit model

Author, booking agent, model. Things I have never seen myself as being, and yet, here I am. This was definitely not listed in the original job description (that, now that I think of it, I don't think I've actually seen…). If I'd done my Facebook homework before taking the job, however, I would have seen that all employees must show proficient product showcasing, and would have been fully prepared! So, alas, this one is all my fault.

So, if you're considering a job in the world of SCUBA, be prepared to be flexible, adaptable, and able to wear many, many hats!

Aloha, Kelly

SALSSA

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Ian Lipchak
April 9, 2013 @ 8:23 pm

Always remember: A diver doesn't choose a mask, it is the mask that chooses the diver! You will become the Ollivander of masks!


Greg Lent (Chronoman)
April 9, 2013 @ 11:12 am

Yo Kelly! You're really grown since I've seen you last! Any suggestions for for a snorkling trip to the Carib. or Mexican waters for an old,(almost) worn-out couple?


Kasper Rasmussen
April 8, 2013 @ 8:15 pm

I know you are good at fixing stuff..seen it firsthand and if you work MDDC you must have class - but do you dive...Tau and I want to see first hand...


Lee
April 8, 2013 @ 8:03 pm

Welcome to the wonderful world of SCUBA Repair. Let us know if we can help you! A hui hou!